Sliding Scale

I work on a sliding scale in my group classes. The standard fee for class is $300, the middle rung is $200 and the lowest cost is $100. For more information about why or how to determine your fee, keep reading! 

Screen-Shot-2018-01-12-at-2-53-18-PM-(1).png

"The sliding scale is a tool that allows for a product or service to be obtained at multiple price points based on the circumstances of the purchaser. This method allows folks who would most likely be priced out of something to have the chance to take part in it. It also seeks to address the systemic inequalities of class in our culture.

For a sliding scale to work, it relies on the principles of truthfulness, respect for complexity, and accountability. I do not ask for income verification. I trust my students and clients to be honest. 

Here is a general guideline about how I currently price my sliding scale and to help you determine where you fall on it.

  • The highest dollar cost reflects the true cost of the class or service. It is the cost that the practitioner would charge all students in the absence of a sliding scale. If you have access to financial security, own property or have personal savings, you would not traditionally qualify for sliding scale services. If you are able to pay for "wants" and spend little time worried about securing necessities in your life, you have economic privilege and power in our community. This price is for you.
  • The middle cost is for families for whom paying the full cost would prevent attending, but who do not honestly find themselves reflected in either descriptions for the highest cost or the lowest.  If you are struggling to conquer debt or build savings or move away from paycheck to paycheck living but have access to steady income and are not spending most of your time thinking about meeting basic needs such as food, shelter, medical care, child care, etc., you belong here. 
  • The bottom cost represents an acknowledgment that there are folks whose economic circumstances would prevent them from being a part of classes if there was not be a deliberate opportunity made for them to access services at a cost that is reflective of their economic realities. If you struggle to maintain access to needs such as health care, housing, food, child care, and are living paycheck to paycheck or are in significant debt, you probably belong here and you deserve a community that honors your price as equal an economic offering as the person who can pay the highest tier. Even when the lower tier is still prohibitive, I will work with folks to offer extended payment plans and other solutions."

 

Quoted portion is an excerpt from an awesome article by Alexis J. Cunningfolk of Worts and Cunning Apothecary. Check out the full original post!